Teacher Programs

Residential Programs

FTE covers housing costs at the residential programs. If you get there, we’ll put you up, feed you, provide outstanding instructors and classroom materials. You’ll experience interactive economic education as it was meant to be: engaging, empowering, and enjoyable.

Economics for Leaders
In these week-long programs, high school teachers “go back to school” and are taught by university professors and mentor teachers. What’s unique are the games and simulations:  instructors run the activities with real students so the teachers can observe the students’ interactions. The teachers see, up close, why FTE-designed lessons are so effective and leave with a better knowledge of economics, new classroom strategies, and a renewed enthusiasm for teaching.

Economic Forces in American History

These widely acclaimed, cross-curricular programs help teachers incorporate economic reasoning into high school American history lessons.

Economic Issues for Teachers

4 Economic Issues curriculum units presented in a special get-away seminar.

Environment and the Economy

Four-day, residential, multi-disciplinary programs that show teachers how to use economic analysis when discussing environmental issues.

Right Start in Teaching Economics

Teachers new to economics identify and learn basic economic content and develop lesson plans for effective teaching of high school economics.

One Day Seminars

FTE one-day programs are an excellent in-service option. We’ll partner with your school district or local economics or social studies organization to offer single-topic workshops that show you how economic reasoning can enhance student learning about contemporary issues. Half-day, evening, and full-day (including Saturday) scheduling available.

Economic Demise of the Soviet Union

These six-hour seminars provide the lesson plans and background information that enable social studies teachers to explain why the economy of the Soviet Union collapsed.

Economics of Disasters

This set of lessons looks at a variety of natural disasters – from the Black Death of the Middle Ages to Hurricane Katrina in our too-recent memory, to fears of avian flu pandemics that haunt the future – through the lens of economic analysis. The contexts were chosen to facilitate the teaching of economic reasoning principles not only in economics courses, but also in history and the other social studies disciplines.

Issues of International Trade

Trade issues occasionally dominate and are a continuing theme of the international scene: the global market, sweatshops, child labor, trade deficits, the euro, sanctions, tariffs, embargoes, and the EU, NAFTA, WTO – the seemingly endless alphabet of interest groups, treaties, organizations, and trade agreements.

Is Capitalism Good for the Poor?

With a generous grant from the John Templeton Foundation, the Foundation for Teaching Economics is creating a high-school unit addressing the question: Is Capitalism Good for the Poor? The curriculum materials use economic reasoning in analyzing the impact—both real and potential—of capitalist institutions on the well-being of the world’s poor.

Online Programs

FTE Online is user-friendly and highly interactive. Participants receive:

  • Economics curriculum, including background content outlines, classroom activities, and teacher guides
  • Lecture (PowerPoint with audio) and Video demonstration CDs of classroom activities
  • Instruction by nationally-acclaimed mentor teachers and professors
  • Online interaction (asynchronous) with teachers throughout the United States and across the world
  • Graduate credit (additional fee) or “clock hour” confirmation.

Economics Online for Teachers (EOFT)

Based on the 10-topic curriculum of the FTE’s flagship Economics for Leaders program, the two Economics Online for Teachers courses are designed to reinforce teachers’ understanding of basic concepts and the tools of economics reasoning that form the foundation for a standards-based, semester-long secondary course in economics. A combination of practice problems (with individual feedback from outstanding instructors experienced in both online and classroom teaching), stimulating discussions with teacher participants from all over the U.S. and around the world, and video demonstrations of classroom activities that address a variety of learning styles, EOFT is designed to increase teacher confidence in both the content and pedagogy of dynamic, engaging economic education. (Optional graduate credit available: Part 1 & Part 2, 2 sem. hrs. each)

The Economic Demise of the Soviet Union Online for Teachers (EDSUO)

With generous grants from the Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics Foundation, FTE first created The Economic Demise of the Soviet Union curriculum materials, and then incorporated the 6 lessons in a graduate-level teacher-education course. Both the curriculum materials and the online instruction focus on the fatal flaw of central planning – the innate inability to get the incentives right. Using the world wide web to enhance and supplement the background information provided in the curriculum outlines, EDSUO helps teachers understand — and explain to their own students — the weaknesses that undermined the Soviet economy. Video demonstrations of classroom activities simulate common features of Soviet daily life, helping to illustrate the application of economic reasoning to historical inquiry: Why did the economy of the Soviet Union collapse when it did? (Optional: 2 sem. hrs. graduate credit available)

Is Capitalism Good for the Poor? Online for Teachers (CAPO)

Funded by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation, Is Capitalism Good for the Poor? uses the tools of institutional economics, current data from respected sources including the World Bank and the United Nations, and case studies from such diverse locations as Brazil, Vietnam, China, Argentina, and Kenya to address that timely question. Lesson topics include:

  • What is poverty and who are the poor?
  • An institutional definition of capitalism
  • The institutions of capitalism: property rights, rule of law, markets, and entrepreneurship
  • Using experimental economics and game theory to investigate the effects of capitalism on cooperative behavior in society
  • Why property rights are the ultimate human rights

Economics of Disasters (EoD)

This set of lessons looks at a variety of natural disasters – from the Black Death of the Middle Ages to Hurricane Katrina in our too-recent memory, to fears of avian flu pandemics that haunt the future – through the lens of economic analysis. The contexts were chosen to facilitate the teaching of economic reasoning principles not only in economics courses, but also in history and the other social studies disciplines.

The Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics Foundation again supported the creation of an online course for teachers based on the content and pedagogy of the high school curriculum unit and the wealth of supplementary sources available on the Internet. This is an intensive, in-depth examination of how one of the newest tools of economic reasoning – institutional analysis – informs one of the toughest challenges of the modern world. (Optional: 3 sem. hrs. graduate credit available)